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"Water in India’s Deccan: a hydrosocial perspective" by Benjamin B. Cohen

Tuesday, January 24, 2017, 12 - 1:30pm
Humanities Building - Carolyn Tanner Irish (CTIHB)

WORK IN PROGRESS TALK OPEN TO THE PUBLIC | SEATING IS LIMITED | LUNCH PROVIDED by BENJAMIN B. COHEN | Department of History Water appears as liquid, ice, or steam, and can take shapes from raindrops to rivers, and from water bottles to reservoirs. In this work-in-progress presentation, I will speak from a current book project on water in India’s Deccan – a large region in south-central India. The presentation will focus on material drawn from two periods of Deccan history, the late medieval Kakatiya Empire, and the early modern Deccan Sultanates. I will explore Deccan history through a hydrosocial lens that sees the relationship between human and aquatic activity in the same analytic focus. This perspective, when deployed over a long-term view of India’s history, offers insights into the ways in which water and human activity have developed in the past, and continue to do so in the present. ABOUT Work-in-Progress Talks give Tanner Humanities Center fellows and University of Utah faculty an opportunity to present the latest work on their current research and receive feedback in a casual setting from students, faculty, staff, and community.


"Blender, Strainer, Enema, Conflict: Differences in Disgust among Medical Practitioners and Patients over Fecal Microbiota Transplants" by Jessica Houf

Tuesday, January 31, 2017, 12 - 1:30pm
Humanities Building - Carolyn Tanner Irish (CTIHB)

WORK IN PROGRESS TALK OPEN TO THE PUBLIC | SEATING IS LIMITED | LUNCH PROVIDED by JESSICA HOUF | Department of Communication Shit is nothing new. Humans-as-animals have produced a lot of shit, but how we react to this expelled mass is currently being revisited. Fecal microbiota transplants (FMT) have recently been approved for treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (RCDI). Despite being 90% effective, this treatment is prescribed by medical authorities only as a last resort for those experiencing the deteriorating effects of long-lasting diarrhea and colitis caused by RCDI. Due to this hesitation on the part of medical practitioners, many patients have taken shit into their own hands and created an alternative community engaged in home-based FMT. This presentation explores patient narratives (from the website The Power of Poop) alongside medical literatures about FMT to understand differing feelings about “disgusting” feces. My key question is: why are fecal transplants felt to be too disgusting for people who are trained to deal with bodies, medical practitioners, while patients – who do not have such training – find them to be acceptable home remedies? Drawing on the work of Dominique Laporte, Sara Ahmed, Daniel Kelly, and other disgust scholars, I unpack conflicting understandings of the "nature" of disgust – as an embodied “truth” or as a socially constructed means of abjection. Ultimately, the conflict concerning the "nature" of disgust reveals a larger problem for the accepted  “germ theory of disease”, which tends to argue that bacteria + filth = disease. Instead, we find (through a focus on RCDI) that Clostridium difficile changes the equation to bacteria + filth = cure. Shit becomes something new. ABOUT Work-in-Progress Talks give Tanner Humanities Center fellows and University of Utah faculty an opportunity to present the latest work on their current research and receive feedback in a casual setting from students, faculty, staff, and community.


"Earl Warren, Ernesto Miranda and Terrorism" by Amos N. Guiora

Tuesday, February 7, 2017, 12 - 1:30pm
Humanities Building - Carolyn Tanner Irish (CTIHB)

TALK AT THE TANNER OPEN TO THE PUBLIC | SEATING IS LIMITED | LUNCH PROVIDED by AMOS N. GUIORA, Professor of Law S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah "Earl Warren, Ernesto Miranda and Terrorism" Earl Warren was a District Attorney, Governor of California, and Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. As Governor of California, Warren was tough on crime, a fierce proponent of law and order, and an advocate of Japanese Internment during WWII, a decision he would later regret. Warren was one of the most significant and influential Chief Justices in US history. Warren wrote the majority opinion in Miranda v. Arizona (1966). In that decision, the Supreme Court created the Miranda warning: “you have the right to remain silent.” In my forthcoming book, “Earl Warren, Ernesto Miranda and Terrorism,” I explore whether Warren would apply that holding to Americans suspected of involvement in domestic terrorism. To answer requires investigation of the following matters: 

  • What were his motivations in a holding widely assumed to be the pinnacle of the so-called “Warren Court criminal procedure-constitutional revolution?”
  • Why would a Chief Justice, whose background was deeply rooted in law enforcement, craft a decision whose focus was protecting suspects? 
  • How did his experiences as District Attorney, Attorney General, and Governor shape his understanding of the imbalance between the interrogated and the interrogator?
  • What was the contemporary context of his holding?
ABOUT Work-in-Progress Talks give Tanner Humanities Center fellows and University of Utah faculty an opportunity to present the latest work on their current research and receive feedback in a casual setting from students, faculty, staff, and community.


"Human Values & The Innocence Project" 2017 Tanner Lecture on Human Values by Barry Scheck, Attorney and Co-Founder of The Innocence Project

Wednesday, February 8, 2017, 7 - 9pm
College of Law - S. J. Quinney (LAW)

The Obert C. & Grace A. Tanner Humanities Center proudly presents The 2017 Tanner Lecture on Human Values "HUMAN VALUES & THE INNOCENCE PROJECT" OPEN TO THE PUBLIC | NO TICKETS REQUIRED by BARRY SCHECK | Attorney, Co-Founder of The Innocence Project
Barry Scheck is an attorney, DNA expert, and co-founder of The Innocence Project. He is known for landmark litigation that set the standards for using DNA evidence in courts. He has spearheaded a nationwide movement to re-examine the fairness and efficacy of our criminal justice system. A Commissioner for the New York State Forensic Science Review Board and Professor at the Cardozo School of Law at Yeshiva University, Scheck is considered one of the 100 most influential lawyers in America. He also will meet with students and faculty from the S. J. Quinney College of Law. ABOUT The Tanner Lectures on Human Values initiates educational and scientific discussions relating to human values. Distinct Tanner Lectures are delivered annually at Oxford University, Cambridge University, Harvard University, Princeton University, Stanford University, University of California - Berkeley, University of Michigan, University of Utah, Yale University, and other educational facilities around the world. Since 2006, we have hosted Isabel Allende, Spike Lee, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Margaret Atwood, and Siddhartha Mukherjee, among others.


"#BlackLivesMatter and the Politics of Racial Mis/Recognition" by Rachel Griffin

Tuesday, February 14, 2017, 12 - 1:30pm
Humanities Building - Carolyn Tanner Irish (CTIHB)

WORK IN PROGRESS TALK OPEN TO THE PUBLIC | SEATING IS LIMITED | LUNCH PROVIDED "#BlackLivesMatter and the Politics of Racial Mis/Recognition" by RACHEL GRIFFIN, Assistant Professor of Race & Communication, Department of Communication, University of Utah Previously tenured at Southern Illinois University, Dr. Griffin is a new faculty member at the U. This talk theorizes #BlackLivesMatter discourses as demands for humanizing recognition that represent a continuation of historicized labor to contest racial oppression. Anchored by the Hegelian assertion that mutually affirming recognition fosters humanization, these discourses respond to racial misrecognition (e.g., stereotypes, microaggressions, stigma, racism, etc.) which has profound consequences for people of color ranging from devaluation to dismissal to death. When #BlackLivesMatter is theorized as a demand for humanizing recognition and simultaneous response to dehumanizing misrecognition, our societal inability to consistently respond with affirmation, compassion, and action is pedagogically revealing in terms of racial progress. ABOUT Work-in-Progress Talks give Tanner Humanities Center fellows and University of Utah faculty an opportunity to present the latest work on their current research and receive feedback in a casual setting from students, faculty, staff, and community.


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Last Updated: 1/9/17