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Are Living Things Beings, Changes, or Both? Matter, Composition, and Biological Unity in Aristotle

Tuesday, February 21, 2017, 12 - 1:30pm
Humanities Building - Carolyn Tanner Irish (CTIHB)

WORK IN PROGRESS TALK OPEN TO THE PUBLIC | SEATING IS LIMITED | LUNCH PROVIDED by ANNE PETERSON | VIRGIL C. ALDRICH FACULTY FELLOW Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Utah “For living things, to be is to live”—so Aristotle insists in his writings on the cause of life.  And to live, as Aristotle knows all too well from his own biological investigations, is to undergo a series of changes—the claim, then, is that for living things, to be is precisely to change in a certain way. Today, however, the pre-Aristotelian opposition between being and change is still at work.  Individuals, groups, and even nations are often reluctant to change their ideas, principles, and policies for fear that so doing will undermine their identity.  Metaphysicians are beset with puzzles about how things could come into or go out of being.  And even within Aristotelian scholarship, a focus on being has obscured the foundational role that becoming has in Aristotle’s thought.  I will argue that properly understanding Aristotle’s analysis of the being of living things requires properly understanding their becoming—both are activities.  On Aristotle’s framework for understanding life, being becomes dynamic rather than static, and change is no longer tied to the interruption of identity.  This framework, I will suggest, is one that we should return to today both in philosophy and in our broader ways of thinking. ABOUT Work-in-Progress Talks give Tanner Humanities Center fellows and University of Utah faculty an opportunity to present the latest work on their current research and receive feedback in a casual setting from students, faculty, staff, and community.


Navajo (Diné) 1020 | Open Class | Indigenous Languages Encounter

Tuesday, February 21, 2017, 12:35 - 1:35pm
Union - A. Ray Olpin (UNION)

Navajo (Diné) 1020 | Open Class Instructor: Tony Shirley Come join us to learn more!


Navajo (Diné) Culture and Tradition | Open Class |Indigenous Languages Encounter

Tuesday, February 21, 2017, 4:35 - 7:35pm
Union - A. Ray Olpin (UNION)

Navajo (Diné) Culture and Tradition 4550 | Open Class Instructor: Tony Shirley Come join us to learn more!


Nahuatl 1020 | Open Class | Indigenous Languages Encounter

Wednesday, February 22, 2017, 5 - 6pm
Language & Communication Bldg (LNCO)

Nahuatl 1020 | Open Class Instructor: Eduardo de la Cruz Cruz Come join us to learn more!


Indigenous Peoples | Open Class | Indigenous Languages Encounter

Thursday, February 23, 2017, 12:30 - 1:45pm
Humanities Building - Carolyn Tanner Irish (CTIHB)

Indigenous Peoples (HUM 4900) | Open Class Instructors: Eduardo de la Cruz Cruz, Isabel Dulfano, and Armando Muyolema Come join us to learn more!


Indigenous Languages Summit

Saturday, February 25, 2017, 9am - 3pm
Humanities Building - Carolyn Tanner Irish (CTIHB)

The Indigenous Languages Summit seeks to raise awareness about the living indigenous languages spoken in the state of Utah. The summit also seeks to develop networks between language instructors, students and members of the community who value indigenous languages. This event will focus on six languages, three historically tied to the region, Diné (Navajo), Shoshone and Ute; as well as three languages new to the region as a result of immigration from Latin America: K'iche', Ecuadorian Quechua and Nahuatl. Panelists:

  • Tashina Barber - Navajo
  • Eduardo de la Cruz Cruz - Nahuatl
  • Drusilla Gould - Shoshone
  • Kristina Groves - Ute
  • Armando Muyolema - Ecuadorian Quechua
  • Julio Alonzo Xocol Tzep - K'iche'
Join the discussion about living indigenous languages!  


NT LIVE Presents: "Amadeus"

Saturday, February 25, 2017, 12 - 3pm
Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. Broadway Salt Lake City, UT 84111

Music. Power. Jealousy. Lucian Msamati (Luther, Game of Thrones, NT Live: The Comedy of Errors) plays Salieri in Peter Shaffer’s iconic play, broadcast live from the National Theatre, and with live orchestral accompaniment by Southbank Sinfonia. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, a rowdy young prodigy, arrives in Vienna, the music capital of the world – and he’s determined to make a splash. Awestruck by his genius, court composer Antonio Salieri has the power to promote his talent or destroy his name. Seized by obsessive jealousy he begins a war with Mozart, with music, and ultimately, with God. After winning multiple Olivier and Tony Awards when it had its premiere at the National Theatre in 1979, Amadeus was adapted into an Academy Award-winning film.


"Unsettling Settler Maculinity" by Matt Basso

Tuesday, February 28, 2017, 12 - 1:30pm
Humanities Building - Carolyn Tanner Irish (CTIHB)

WORK IN PROGRESS TALK OPEN TO THE PUBLIC | SEATING IS LIMITED | LUNCH PROVIDED by MATT BASSO | VIRGIL C. ALDRICH FACULTY FELLOW Associate Professor, Department of History & Gender Studies, University of Utah Settler Colonial Studies is a relatively new field, having emerged at the end of the 20th Century.  Its founding scholars, while linking their work to the long history of research on colonialism, contend that settler colonialism is a process quite distinct from and even antithetical to classic extractive colonialism. Two of the central precepts of settler colonial studies hold that a normative and predictable whiteness and masculinity characterized the paradigmatic settler and the state he built. This presentation, drawn from my current book project, explores the ideology and practices of white settler masculinity in one settler society, New Zealand, between 1890 and 1950. I focus on four points of friction: land, labor, immigration, and war. Dwelling on the last of these, I will discuss how the experiences of World War One veterans reveal some of the complexities and contradictions of settler masculinity. ABOUT Work-in-Progress Talks give Tanner Humanities Center fellows and University of Utah faculty an opportunity to present the latest work on their current research and receive feedback in a casual setting from students, faculty, staff, and community.


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Last Updated: 2/9/17